Monday, March 19, 2018

Inspired by West Virginia, Teachers Spread Red for Ed Movement across Arizona

Labor Notes
By Rebecca Garelli
March 15, 2018

While Oklahoma teachers and school employees gear up for a possible statewide strike starting April 2, a teacher uprising is also brewing in Arizona.  Teacher pay in Arizona ranks last in the country by some measures.  Educators there, inspired by their counterparts in West Virginia, are rapidly organizing to change that.  Within the last 10 days, 30,000 Arizona teachers have flooded into their own Facebook group, Arizona Educators United, and begun a series of highly visible actions, sporting their "Red for Ed" T-shirts wherever they go.  Labor Notes interviewed Phoenix, Arizona, seventh-grade math and science teacher Rebecca Garelli, a leader in the group.

This all got started two Fridays ago, March 2.  I had become friends with Jay O'Neal from West Virginia, who helped start the teachers and public employees Facebook group there, and he let me into their group.  I'd been hanging out, just watched things, thinking, "Why is nobody in Arizona doing this?"  So my Chicago blood got boiling, and I said, "I'm just going to spark the fire, I'll be the catalyst."

Read the full article at the Labor Notes website here.

In Transparency Lawsuits, The University of Wisconsin Ends Up On The losing Side

WUWM Milwaukee Public Media
By Joy Powers
March 13, 2018

It's Sunshine Week, and that's not a crack about the weather.  The annual event is an effort led by news organizations, that seeks to inform people about their right to access public information.  It's a right that has had many enemies - both historically and currently - but it's also a right that has endured many tests.

As a young journalist in Madison, David Pritchard found himself testing the strength of this right.  Pritchard is now a journalism professor at UW-Milwaukee, but in the 1970s he was on the opposing side of the state's university system when he sued UW-Madison for access to public records.

Read the full article at the WUWM website here.

Friday, March 9, 2018

AAUP Calls for Sensible Gun Control Measures

AAUP
March 6, 2018

The recent mass shooting of fourteen students and three adults at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, has refocused efforts to stem the epidemic of gun violence plaguing the nation.  This time the effort has been initiated and led by the surviving students, supported by their teachers, parents, and students across the country.  The American Association of University Professors salutes these brave and eloquent young people, many of whom will soon enter colleges and universities.  We hope they will continue their activism on our campuses.

Read the full post at the AAUP website here.

Off-Campus Bigotry

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
March 7, 2018

A professor of career counseling at Golden West College is on leave for the next two weeks after she was recorded telling an Asian-American man and his family to go back the their "home country."

The college declined to say whether the professor, Tarin F. Olson, was suspended or took voluntary leave, saying it was a "personnel matter."

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Race and Gender Bias in Online Courses

Inside Higher Ed
By Scott Jaschik
March 8, 2018

Many proponents of online education have speculated that the digital learning environment might be a meritocracy, where students are judged not on their race or gender, but on the comments they post.

A study being released today by the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University, however, finds that bias appears to be strong in online course discussions.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

U. of Wisconsin at Stevens Point Proposes Cutting 13 Programs, Mostly in Liberal Arts

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Fernanda Zamudio-Suarez
March 5, 2018

The University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point wants to eliminate 13 academic programs, primarily in the liberal arts, and the cuts, if carried out, could result in the layoff of tenured faculty members, according to a university news release.

Administrators cited the campus's $4.5 million deficit and declining enrollment as reasons for the cuts, according to the release.  To increase enrollment, officials want to add 16 programs "in areas with high-demand career paths" such as computer information systems, finance, and chemical engineering, among many others.  Eight other existing programs, including environmental engineering and captive wildlife, would be expanded into majors or degrees under the plan.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education website here.

Harvard Professor Will Retire After Chronicle Investigation Revealed Harassment Allegations

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Tom Bartlett and Nell Gluckman
March 6, 2018

A prominent Harvard professor and former vice provost accused of groping, kissing, and other inappropriate behavior by close to 20 women announced on Tuesday that he would retire on June 30.  Jorge Dominguez, a professor of government, was placed on administrative leave pending a review after a Chronicle investigation published last week.

"I am retiring from my job at Harvard at the end of this semester," Dominguez wrote in an email to colleagues.  "It has been a privilege to serve the university."  He also noted that he is not teaching this semester and has stepped down from his administrative roles.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education website here.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Hawaii Legislators Abandon Plan for Faculty Mandate on OER

Inside Higher Ed
By Lindsay McKenzie
February 27, 2018

Hawaii legislators last month backtracked on a bill that would have forced faculty members in the University of Hawaii system to use open educational resources -- freely accessible and openly licensed teaching materials.

The legislation, proposed as a way to reduce high textbook and other costs for students, was reportedly inspired by the early success of existing OER initiatives in the university system, which are collectively saving students hundreds of thousands of dollars a semester.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Posttenure Review or a Plan to Undercut Tenure?

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
February 27, 2018

A joint committee of faculty members and administrators from across the University of Tennessee's four campuses spent months revising the system's posttenure review policy, which it acknowledged was outdated and needed strengthening.  The committee included the university system's Board of Trustees in its process and its recommendations were adopted this year, with the goal of making posttenure review clearer and more meaningful.

So professor's from across the system are baffled and alarmed by a new, hastily written add-on proposal from the trustees, with some saying it challenges the idea of tenure altogether.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

HBCUs and the Trump Administration

Inside Higher Ed
By Andrew Kreighbaum
February 28, 2018

WASHINGTON -- Officials from the Trump administration have faced intense protests when visiting historically black colleges and universities, and leaders of those institutions themselves have taken heat from students and faculty for even meeting with administration officials.

But groups that represent historically black colleges have pursued a highly public, if controversial, strategy of courting influence with the White House and Republican lawmakers.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Relocation, Relocation, Relocation

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
February 28, 2018

Real estate on the University of Texas at Austin campus is scarce -- so scarce that the College of Fine Arts and the University of Texas Libraries have already moved tens of thousands of books, journals, music scores, CDs and other works from Austin's Fine Arts Library off-site with little input from the faculty.  That, along with a proposal to keep culling and moving the collection, has many professors up in arms.

"The declared aim is to move libraries into the 21st century, and nobody's opposing that here," said Thomas G. Palaima, Robert M. Armstrong Centennial Professor in Classics and director for Austin's program in Aegean scripts and prehistory.  "But don't move it into the 21st century by destroying a resource that's been built up over decades and decades."

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Ending 'Mom and Pop' Governance

Inside Higher Ed
By Rick Seltzer
March 1, 2018

The challenges colleges and universities face are well documented and often intimidating. 

Population trends will leave institutions in some parts of the country without enough traditional-age local students to fill classrooms, while stretching others' capacity.  Costs keep escalating, high sticker prices are a consistent source of angst and constantly rising discount rates leave many private colleges in the difficult position of not having enough money coming in even as they're perceived by students as being too expensive.

Read the article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

When Journals Play Favorites

Inside Higher Ed
By Coleen Flaherty
March 2, 2018

Academic publishing is supposed to favor the strongest research -- regardless of who's producing it.  Yet we know that isn't always true.  Various studies suggest that the system leans toward significant or favorable results over null ones, research coming from elite institutions, and male authors over women, for example.

A new study examines another possible kind of bias: whether journals favor research affiliated with their publishing institutions.  The short answer is yes.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Michigan's State's Ex-President Now Holds a Prestigious Professorship. Some of Her Colleagues Aren't Happy About It.

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Sarah Brown
February 26, 2018

When Lou Anna K. Simon stepped down under pressure last month as Michigan State University's president, she signed her resignation letter with a nod to her new faculty title: "John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor."

The Hannah professorship, named for one of Simon's predecessors, is the highest faculty honor at the university.  The posts are often awarded to star scholars as part of their recruitment to Michigan State.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education's website here.

She Left Harvard. He Got to Stay.

The Chronicle for Higher Education
By Tom Bartlett
February 27, 2018

Terry Karl lost count of how many times he tried to kiss her.  In his office, in her office, at a hotel during a conference.  She remembers the night in her car when he confided that he would be the next department chairman, and that he woud review the book she was writing.  It was unfortunate, he said, that he had to decide the fates of people he liked.  He moved his hand to touch her thigh, beneath her skirt, and leaned in for a kiss.

It was November 5, 1981.  Karl had been at Harvard University for less than a year.  She was an assistant professor of government, and Jorge Dominguez was her senior colleague.  He had tenure; she didn't.  Dominguez would soon be president of the Latin American Studies Association; she studied Latin America.  He sat on the editorial boards of prestigious journals like American Political Science Review and Social Science Quarterly.  He was already named in the field, while she was still establishing hers.  He could be helpful to her - or not.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education website here.

Rochester Faculty Senate Censures Professor Accused of Harassment

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Katherine Mangan
February 27, 2018

The University of Rochester's Faculty Senate voted on Tuesday to censure T. Florian Jaeger, a professor in the department of brain and cognitive sciences who was accused of sexual harassment but largely cleared by a recent independent investigation.

The measure, which had been shelved after more than a dozen people weighed in at the Senate's last meeting, passed by a vote of 20 to 19, with two abstentions, according to two people who attended the closed meeting.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education's website here.

Trump Wants to Arm Teachers. These Schools Already Do.

The New York Times
By Erica L. Green and Manny Fernandez
March 1, 2018

SIDNEY, Ohio - The 8-by-11-inch box sits atop a bookshelf in the district headquarters, as much a part of the office furniture as the manila folders, yearbooks and Webster's dictionaries.  Inside is a semiautomatic Glock handgun with extra magazines, equipment that education leaders here say will prevent this district from suffering the next schoolhouse tragedy.

Dispersed throughout the seven school buildings in this rural Ohio district outside of Dayton are dozens of biometric safes, tucked away discreetly in closets and classrooms, only accessible to a designated staff member whose fingerprint can open the box.  A bulletproof vest is nearby, in an undisclosed location, fortified to protect against any bullet except one fired from an assault rifle.

Read the full article at The New York Times website here.

Friday, February 23, 2018

Amicus Brief Supports "Sanctuary Jurisdictions"

AAUP
February 12, 2018

The AAUP joined yesterday with other groups, including members of the California Community College System, in filing an amicus brief in support of a permanent injunction against a Trump administration executive order that sought to strip federal funding from "sanctuary jurisdictions."  The lawsuit resulting in the injunction was filed by the city of San Francisco.  The AAUP's interest in the case stems from the potential application of the executive order to colleges and universities.

Read the full post at the AAUP website here.

'Here We Are Again'

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
February 16, 2018

For the third time this month, scholars are questioning the integrity of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the world's largest professional organization for the advancement of technology.

Last week, scholars criticized Alexander Magoun, an outreach historian at the IEEE, for comments he made on the organization's official Twitter account about the work of a female junior scholar that he later admitted he hadn't read.  Some called the comments he made about Google search returns for "white girls" and "black girls" dismissive, inappropriate or racist.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

The conundrum of a fire alarm and gunfire: Flee, or lock down?

OregonLive
By The Associated Press
February 17, 2018

Students and teachers responded as trained when the fire alarm sounded, streaming out of the school and toward exits only to run into deadly gunfire.

Two boys with stolen guns took aim from a wooded hill, waiting for people to evacuate after one of the boys had triggered a false fire alarm.  They killed four children and a teacher.

Read the full article at the OregonLive website here.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

U of Chicago Graduate Student Union Withdraws NLRB Request

Academe Blog
By John K. Wilson
February 14, 2018

Today, the University of Chicago Graduate Students United announced that they are withdrawing their request to have the NLRB recognize the overwhelming vote last October to form an AFT/IFT/AAUP-affiliated union.  This is not the end of the union movement, but a tactical move to prevent the Trump Administration from overturning precedents recognizing graduate student rights.

Now, the battle continues to demand that the University of Chicago Administration stop violating the rights of its students and give them the freedom to choose to join a union.

Read the full article including the announcement from Graduate Students united at the Academe blog website here.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

N.Y. Teamsters form 'sanctuary union' to fight ICE agents

New York Daily News
By Ginger Adams Otis
February 10, 2018

Worried about federal immigration policies, a New York labor organization is taking steps to protect its own.

Across Long Island and throughout the city, some 12,000 Teamsters are getting prepped to become a "sanctuary union."

Read the full article at the New York Daily News website here.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Labour MP refuses to cross picket line in solidarity with striking lecturers

Morning Star
By Peter Lazenby
February 10, 2018

A LABOUR MP has cancelled a lecture she was due to give at the University of Manchester because she refuses to cross picket lines.

Lucy Powell was scheduled to deliver the address on Thursday February 22, the day that members of the University and College Union (UCU) launch a series of 14 strikes in defence of their pensions.

Read the full article at the Morning Star website here.

Friday, February 9, 2018

Oregon bill combats DACA termination, continues college tuition equity

Statesman Journal
By Natalie Pate
February 7, 2018

Despite national efforts to end DACA, undocumented student in Oregon will continue to have access to tuition equity if Senate Bill 1563 passes.

Students who are not citizens have historically had to apply for "official federal identification" - Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals documentation - before they can be eligible for resident tuition at public universities.

Read the full article at the Statesman Journal website here.

Governance Committee Denounces Remarks by UW System President

AAUP- National
February 8, 2018

In October 2017, news broke of University of Wisconsin system president Ray Cross's decision to propose a merger of the system's two- and four-year institutions.  It was the latest in a number of unilateral and secretive actions taken by system leaders, state legislature, and Governor Scott Walker, condemned at the time by the AAUP and AFT Wisconsin as consulting "a concerted attack on the university as a public good and on the university's role in fostering democratic participation."

The day after the news of the proposed merger, President Cross, facing backlash from faculty, staff, and students, wrote the following in an email message to a system regent: "Getting hammered by the 'shared governance' leaders because they weren't involved in the process; however, had they been involved we wouldn't be doing anything!!"

Read the full post at the AAUP website here.

Budget Deal Would Add Money, but Not Restore DACA

Inside Higher Ed
By Andrew Kreighbaum and Elizabeth Redden
February 8, 2018

Senate leaders on Wednesday looked poised to reach an agreement on a two-year budget deal that would lift spending caps put in place at federal agencies by Congress in 2011.  The lifting of those caps has long been sought by higher ed institutions who say they threaten sustainable funding of research.

The agreement would add $4 billion in new money for student aid, according to a brief summary document circulated on Capitol Hill Wednesday, and boost spending on the National Institutes of Health by $2 billion.  Not included in the deal is a fix for the group of young immigrants known as Dreamers, who have faced uncertainty over their status since President Trump announced in September that he would wind down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.  DACA provides temporary protection against deportation and work authorization to hundreds of thousands of young immigrants -- including many college students -- who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Using the N-Word

Inside Higher Ed
By Scott Jaschik
February 9, 2018

Eric Triffin is known for singing and dancing in New Haven, where since 1986 he has been an adjunct in public health at Southern Connecticut State University.  He typically begins his classes by asking a student to pick and play a song.  Many times he joins in the song and dances to it.

Triffin was suspended this week when he sang along to a song that a student played at the beginning of class, a rap song that featured the N-word.  Some black student leaders are calling for the university to punish Triffin for what he did in class that day.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Power of the Purse

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
February 9, 2018

Institutions will now have to tell the National Science Foundation when a principal investigator, co-PI or any other grant "personnel" are found to have committed sexual misconduct or harassment of any kind -- or when the allegations against a PI or co-PI are severe enough to warrant suspension during a campus investigation.

The change, announced Thursday, is one of the ways the NSF hopes to foster the kinds of positive research climates that keep students in science, France Cordova, foundation director, said during a news conference.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

As U. of Washington Braces for Right-Wing Rally, Judge Bars It From Charging Security Fee

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Andy Thomason
February 9, 2018

A federal judge on Friday granted a request for a temporary injunction barring the University of Washington from charging the campus's College Republicans a $17,000 security fee in order to host a rally by Patriot Prayer, a right-wing group, The Seattle Times reports.

The College Republicans sued the university on Tuesday, calling the fee "draconian and unreasonable" and arguing that it was illegal.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Ed website here.

Friday, February 2, 2018

The Death of College Free-Speech Zones

Inside Higher Ed
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf
February 2, 2018

In 2016, Kevin Shaw, a student at Los Angeles Pierce College, was stopped from passing out Spanish-language copies of the Constitution around the community college.  He was told he needed to keep his activities confined to a small slice of campus -- what the institution has deemed its "free-speech zone."

Such areas, designated at some colleges both public and private, are where administrators expect students to exercise their free-speech rights to avoid interrupting the campus flow.  They can be small, such as the one at Pierce College, which was a rectangle no more than three parking spots wide, a little more than 600 square feet -- or limiting in other ways.  At the University of South Dakota, a student needs to reserve a free-speech spot at least five days in advance.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Less Community, More Vocational

Inside Higher Ed
By Ashley A. Smith
February 2, 2018

The Trump administration's rhetoric for more work force and career training increased Thursday, with the president calling for community colleges to undergo a name change.

President Trump's call for more vocational training (quotation and video below) reflects statements he made during Tuesday's State of the Union, during which he called for a larger national investment in work-force development.  But community college leaders were quick to point out that their institutions already offer the vocational or work-force programs Trump has highlighted, and more.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

'White Supremacists Are Targeting College Campuses Like Never Before'

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Emma Kerr
February 1, 2018

White -supremacist propaganda at colleges increased by 258 percent from the fall of 2016 to the fall of 2017, affecting 216 campuses across the nation, according to a study released on Thursday by the Anti-Defamation League.

For just the fall-2017 semester, the organization found 147 incidents of white-supremacist fliers, stickers, banners, or posters on campuses - up from 41 reported during the fall-2016 semester.  In the past year, the group said, 346 incidents have been reported in all, at colleges in 44 states and Washington, D.C., from community colleges to the Ivy League.

Read the full article at the Willamette Week website here.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Important January 2018 Leadership Update + Brief Filed in Janus v. AFSCME

AAUP Collective Bargaining Congress
AAUP Email Communication
January 22, 2018

Welcome to a new semester and a new year.  We know that we will face challenges in 2018, but we also see great hope emerging because of AAUP leaders like you.

On Friday, the AAUP filed with the National Education Association (NEA) an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court.

The case Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 31 is the latest legal threat to union rights and is part of a broader effort to weaken the power of working people, to undermine public services, and to erode the common good.  The AAUP, with its members and allies across the country, will continue to fight these attacks, and AAUP chapters will continue to organize to defend higher education as a public good.

Read the full communication here.

Friday, January 26, 2018

When a Field's Reputation Precedes It

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
January 25, 2018

Theories abound as to why women remain underrepresented in may fields.  A new study says that perceived gender bias in a given discipline is the primary criterion women use for selecting a college major, not the perception that a field science or math oriented (sorry, Larry Summers).

Departments "need to think through what types of messages they may be sending about gender and who belongs in a particular major," said lead author Colleen Ganley, an assistant professor of psychology at Florida State University.  "These messages could be quite subtle, but, based on our data, people seem to be picking up on them."

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Michigan State president announces resignation

OregonLive
By The Associated Press
January 24, 2018

LANSING, Mich. -- Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon has announced that she is resigning.

Simon is stepping down in the wake of a scandal involving Larry Nassar, who worked at Michigan State as a medical doctor.  Nassar was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison for molesting young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment.

Many of the victims accused the university of mishandling past complaints about Nassar.

Read the full article at the OregonLive website here.

'Some Kind of Authority'

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
January 24, 2018

In an extremely rare move that expresses ongoing internal disapproval of how the University of Rochester handled a major sexual harassment case, the institution's Faculty Senate is considering censuring the professor at the center of it all.

During a senate meeting Tuesday, the body's executive committee also introduced a motion condemning employees in the university counsel's office who searched the emails of professors who sought to bring the case to light - and then shared those emails with the professors' department chair without permission.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Students from defunct ITT Tech get a shot at claiming school's remaining assets

OregonLive
By The Washington Post
January 24, 2018

A federal judge approved a settlement Wednesday allowing former students at ITT Technical Institute to participate in the bankruptcy proceedings of its parent company, giving them a shot at the remaining assets of one of the nation's largest for-profit college operators.

The agreement resolves a lawsuit students filed against ITT Educational Services last year to join the line of creditors, federal regulators, state attorney general and employees seeking redress from the defunct company.  It recognizes a $1.5 billion claim that students, who attended the school between 2006 and 2016, asserted against the company for breach of contract and consumer protection violations.

Read the full article at the OregonLive website here.

Kicked Out for Racism

Inside Higher Ed
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf
January 23, 2018

Note: This article contains explicit and potentially offensive terms that are essential to reporting on this situation.

The cases were similar and the punishment was the same.

Not even three years ago, many Americans applauded as the University of Oklahoma kicked out two fraternity members for their role in helping lead a racist chant that was recorded and went viral.  But despite popular support for that decision and the shuttering of the campus chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, legal experts said the institution had actually flouted the students' First Amendment rights, which protects even the vilest of speech.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Stranger Things

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
January 22, 2018

Tarrant County College in Texas suspended an astronomy instructor last week after he reportedly entered the classroom late with his head, face and hands covered, turned off the lights, and spoke about Islam.

Some students said they thought the incident was a joke.  But others were frightened and called the police.  Campus officers searched and questioned the instructor, Daniel Mashburn, but did not arrest him.

Read the full article at the OregonLive website here.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Why It's So Hard to Calculate What You'll Pay for College

The New York Times
By Ron Lieber
January 19, 2018

ALONG THE MASSACHUSETTS TURNPIKE - It's high season for the people with some of the toughest jobs in higher education.

No, not the admissions officers and their piles of applications.  I'm talking about the people who run what's become to be known as enrollment management.  When they're not talking to the families writing the tuition checks, they speak in business terms - of overall discount rates and net tuition revenue.

Read the full article at The New York Times website here.

Union is Formed at Los Angeles Times and Publisher Put on Leave

The New York Times
By Sydney Ember
January 19, 2018

Journalists at The Los Angeles Times voted overwhelmingly to form a union despite aggressive opposition from the paper's management team, reversing more than a century of anti-union sentiment at one of the biggest newspapers in the country.

Shortly after the final vote count was announced on Friday, The Time's parent company said that the newspaper's publisher, Ross Levinsohn, was taking an unpaid leave of absence while a law firm investigated allegations of coarse workplace behavior while he was employed by other companies.

Read the full article at The New York Time's website here.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Carrier Plant Workers Are Livid After Facing Layoffs Despite Trump's Promises

Truthout
By Bryce Covert
January 16, 2018

Even before he officially took office, President-elect Donald Trump flew to Indianapolis in December of 2016 to trumpet a deal he had reached with air conditioning and heating furnace manufacturer Carrier.  In return for Trump's pledge to reduce the corporate tax rate and reduce regulations, as well as $7 million in economic incentives, the company agreed to keep some jobs in the state rather than move them to a plant in Mexico as planned.

While Trump bragged that he had saved 1,100 jobs, the truth was just 730 jobs were preserved at the Indianapolis plant.  In reality, 550 from Indianapolis were still being moved to Mexico, and all 700 workers at the company's Huntington plant would still lose their jobs.

Read the full article at the Truthout website here.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Janus Oral Arguments Scheduled for Feb 26 2018

SCOTUSblog
By Amy Howe
December 20, 2017

Court releases February calendar

The Supreme Court today released the calendar for its February sitting, which starts on Tuesday, February 20 (because Monday, February 19 is a holiday) and ends on Wednesday, February 28.  The justices will hear nine oral arguments over five days, with the highest-profile argument of the sitting coming on February 26 in Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the challenges to the constitutionality of the fees paid by government employees who are represented by, but do not belong to, a union.  The justices have already held oral arguments on the questions presented by Janus twice before; they did not decide the issue the first time, while they deadlocked the second time on the wake of the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

Read the full blog post at the SCOTUSblog here.