Friday, April 28, 2017

In the age of Trump, can labor unite?

In These Times
By Alexandra Bradbury
April 26, 2017

You know you're getting the short end of the stick as a worker, but you don't really know why," says Joe Tarulli, a Staten Island Verizon tech who's put in 17 years with the company.  "They make it seem like these rich people are just lucky they got the right chances, and these poor old working folks, nothing ever goes right for them.  No!  These corporations are doing it on purpose."

In These Times May 2017 Issue
Last spring Tarulli and 39,000 Verizon workers were forced out on a 49-day strike to fend off outsourcing and other concessions demanded by the company, even as it raked in billions of profits.  Democratic primary candidate Bernie Sanders walked the picket line with them to draw media attention to their battle against corporate greed.  But in the general election, Tarulli says many of his coworkers went on to vote for Donald Trump, who spoke to the anger that had motivated them to strike in the first place.  "Trump's a great communicator," says Tarulli.  "For a long time people felt ignored, even by their own unions, because these companies take advantage of them so badly."

Read the full article at the In These Times website here.


Thursday, April 27, 2017

A Worrisome Harbinger of Changes in Copyright Law

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Pamela Samuelson
April 23, 2017

With all the dysfunction in the White House and Capitol Hill this year, you might think that the copyright bills pending before Congress do not need your attention.  Think again.  Momentum is building for three of these measures, and their impact on institutions of higher education will not be welcome.

The most likely of the bills to pass (and scheduled this week) is the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act of 2017.  It has bipartisan support from 32 cosponsors in the House, and endorsement of three key members of the Senate Judiciary Committee.  The bill calls for the Register of Copyrights to be a presidential appointee for a 10-year term, subject to Senate confirmation.  This bill has already been reported out of the House Judiciary Committee.

Boris Séméniako for The Chronicle
Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


Wednesday, April 26, 2017

After a Week of Protest, U. of Utah Cancer Researcher Is Reinstated

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Alex Arriaga
April 25, 2017

A week after the University of Utah announced that the chief executive and director of its Huntsman Cancer Institute was leaving her post, she's been reinstated.

"Effective today we have changed HCI's reporting structure, and Dr. Beckerle will report directly to the president of the university," the statement said.  "I am grateful for her committed leadership and look forward to working with her in the coming years."

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education website here.

This is a follow up to the article, Top Researcher's Departure Prompts Faculty Protest at U. of Utah Institute which can be read here.


Monday, April 24, 2017

Enrollment Declines, Transfer Barriers: Community College President's Survey

Inside Higher Ed
By Ashley A. Smith and Doug Lederman
April 21, 2017

Six in 10 leaders of community colleges say their enrollments have declined in the past three years, including 21 percent who say enrollment is down by 10 percent or more, according to Inside Higher Eds 2017 Survey of Community College Presidents.

The survey, conducted by Gallup, is based on responses from 236 leaders of two-year colleges, who were queried about recruitment, the future of free community college and the emerging talent pool for new presidents, among other topics.

Read the full article and survey results at the Inside Higher Ed website here.




In the DeVos Era, New Higher-Ed Policy Could Come From the Senate

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Adam Harris
April 24, 2017

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Recent moves by the Education Department have raised the alarms of students, advocates, and reformers alike.  But the executive branch is not the only place where policy is set.  In recent years, the U.S. Senate has taken the lead on policies that have left a sharp imprint on higher education.  So what will legislators be able to accomplish on higher ed this Congress?

The U.S. Senate Committee on Heath, Education, Labor, and Pensions has, over the last several years, successfully advanced a fair amount of bipartisan legislation.  But several early disputes may strain that bipartisanship, weakening the chances of reauthorizing the Higher Education Act.  The most recent act, which is the major piece of legislation governing policy on post secondary education, was set to expire in 2013, but was extended through last year to allow legislators more time to work on an updated version.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


2 Illinois Professors Were Laid Off. Then They Got Tenure. Now What?

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Sarah Brown
April 21, 2017
Holly Stovall, a professor of women's studies at Western
Illinois U., received word that she would be laid off about six
months before she got tenure. "The sense of betrayal is really
traumatic for me." she says.

On May 6, 2016, Holly A. Strovall received the news she'd spent much of her life working toward.

Jack Thomas, president of Western Illinois University, told the women's studies scholar that, after more than a decade on the faculty, she was one step away from receiving tenure.  Once the institution's Board of Trustees signed off, it would be official.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


Resident Advisers Gain the Right to Unionize

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Peter Schmidt
April 21, 2017

George Washington U./ Getty Images
The right to unionize has been extended to resident advisers at private colleges, thanks to a National Labor Relations Board officer's decision involving George Washington University.

The unprecedented ruling, by Sean R. Marshall, acting regional director of the NLRB's Baltimore office, could open the door to efforts to unionize resident advisers and other undergraduate employees throughout private higher education.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


Thursday, April 20, 2017

Support for public higher education rose in 33 states and declined in 17 in 2016

The Chronicle of Higher Education
Illinois and Everyone Else
By Rick Seltzer
April 20, 2017

It's impossible to examine state higher education finances in 2016 without separating the collapse in Illinois from a more nuanced picture across the rest of the country.

State and local support for higher education in Illinois plunged as the state's law makers and governor were unable to reach a budget agreement and instead passed severely pared-down stopgap funding.  Educational appropriations per full-time equivalent student in the state skidded 80 percent year over year, from $10,986 to $2,196.  Enrollment in public institutions dropped by 11 percent, or 46,000 students.

Read the full article with a link to the report at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

AAUP Supports College For All Act

AAUP
April 19, 2017

The AAUP endorsed the College for All Act, introduced this month by Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Pramila Jayapal, which would make four-year public college free for families making less than $125,000 and make community college free for all.  Funding would come from a Wall Street speculation tax.  It would also student loan debts by cutting all student loan interest rates for new borrowers while also preventing the federal government from profiting off the student-loan program.  The College for All Act restores the promise that higher education is an accessible public good, not a privilege for the wealthy few.

Rudy Fichtenbaum, AAUP president said, "The College for All Act reaffirms our commitment to quality, public higher education as a right for all Americans.  It would expand access to higher education and would help former students already saddled with large student debt to refinance at rates that are offered for new student loans.  It would cut down on the abuse of adjunct labor and strengthen academic freedom protections by increasing the percentage of tenured and tenured-track faculty.  The AAUP is proud to endorse the College for All Act."

Read the College for All fact sheet here.
Read the College for All Act here.

Read the original article on the AAUP website here.


Baylor U.'s Pick as New President Will Be First Woman at Its Helm

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Fernanda Zamudio-Suaréz
April 18, 2017

Linda A. Livingstone, dean and professor of management at the George Washington University School of Business, will be the new president of Baylor University, it announced on Tuesday in a news release.

She will be the first woman to serve as president of the Texas institution, the world's largest Baptist university, and will take office on June 1.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education website here.

Top Researcher's Departure Prompts Faculty Protest at U. of Utah Institute

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Alex Arriaga
April 18, 2017

After 11 years as chief executive and director of the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute, Mary Beckerle will leave the posts, a move that has faculty members upset.

The university's senior vice president for health services, Vivian Lee, notified the faculty in an email on Monday but did not offer an explanation, according to The Salt Lake Tribune.

Read the f ull article at The Chronicle for Higher Education website here.

Berkeley Cancels Speech by Ann Coulter, citing Possibility of Rioting

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Chris Quintana
April 19, 2017

Citing security concerns, administrators at the University of California at Berkeley have cancelled a planned speech by the right-wing commentator Ann Coulter.
Photo: Fernando Leon

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that vice chancellors at the university emailed the student groups hosting the event on Tuesday night with the news of the cancelled event.

Read the full article at the Chronicle of Higher Education website here.


Faculty Union at Rider U. Votes No Confidence in University's President

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Alex Arriaga
April 19, 2017

Members of Rider University's faculty union have voted no confidence in the New Jersey institution's president, Gregory G. Dell'Omo, with 75 percent of the votes against him.

"A series of rash actions by President Dell'Omo and a decade of dubious financial management by his financial team has compelled Rider's faculty to pass the motion," the university's chapter of the American Association of University Professors said in a statement.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education website here.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Black Colleges Grapple With Fresh Leadership Tensions

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Adam Harris
April 14, 2017
John S. Wilson Jr. former president of Morehouse College
(Paras Griffin, Getty Images)

Recent tensions at a handful of historically black colleges and universities have renewed concerns about the leadership troubles that have threatened to destabilize some HBCU campuses over the past year.

Read the article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


AAUP Releases Annual Faculty Compensation Report

The AAUP released their annual faculty compensation report on Tuesday, April 11.  This week, The Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed have released articles on the report.  Links to all three are below.


AAUP
Visualizing Change: The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession, 2016-17

The Chronicle of Higher Education
Faculty Salaries Barely keep Pace With Inflation

Inside Higher Ed
The More Things Change


American U Grad Students Unionize

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
April 11, 2017

Graduate student workers at American University voted to form a union affiliated with Service Employees International Union, 212 to 40, they announced Monday.  Some 761 students were eligible to vote, according to information from the university.

The National Labor Relations Board said last summer that graduate student employees at private institutions are entitled to collective bargaining.  Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Black Professors at Kentucky State Vote No Confidence in Faculty Senate's President

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Adam Harris
April 7, 2017

Members of the Faculty Caucus of Color at Kentucky State University have voted to express the "highest confidence" in Karen Bearden, chairwoman of the Board of Regents, but no confidence in Kimberly Sipes, president of the Faculty Senate.

Last month the Faculty Senate at the historically black university, in Frankfort, Ky., voted no confidence in Ms. Bearden following a rocky presidential search.  Black faculty members on the campus said the vote was split almost entirely along racial lines.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.

All Members of Faculty Senate at Gordon College Resign Their Posts

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Fernanda Zamudio-Suaréz
April 7, 2017

All seven members of Gordon College's Faculty Senate resigned from their elected posts on Wednesday over disagreements with administrators over shared governance, The Tartan, the Massachusetts campus's student newspaper, reported.

According to The Boston Globe, the resignations came in an apparent show of support for a faculty member who says she was denied a promotion because she has criticized the Christian college's opposition to same-sex relationships.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education's website here.

New York State is Set to Test Free Tuition

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Ian Withelm
April 9, 2017

New York is set to offer free tuition to public colleges for state residents who earn less than $125,000 a year, reports the Associated Press.  Under a deal between Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a democrat, and legislatures, students from such families will be able to enroll at campuses of the State University of New York or the City University of New York without paying tuition.

While other states allow free tuition to community colleges as well as other reduces tuition programs, the New York effort is being called the nation's first free-tuition program for middle-class families.  Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.


Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Universities Take Steps to Improve Working Conditions for Adjuncts

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Nell Gluckman
April 5, 2017

For years, Pennsylvania State University's faculty had watched the percentage of untenured professors in their ranks inch upward.  Then, about four years ago, that group was finally in the majority.  It was a wake up call.
Pennsylvania State U. Mary Miles, a senior lecturer in English
at Penn State's main Campus, has taught there for 15 years,
but she says she stillfields questions from students about
whether she is a "real professor."

"When you hit the point where you're majority fixed-term faculty, you've got some explaining to do," said Michael Bérubé, a literature professor who is chair of the University Faculty Senate's committee on faculty affairs.  "Either you come up with conversion to tenure or you come up with a good way of stabilizing and improving their working conditions and treating them like the professionals they are."

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Welcome Santa Fe Faculty! - AAUP

AAUP Updates
March 29, 2017

Full time faculty at Santa Fe Community College voted overwhelmingly today to form a union under the AAUP umbrella.  As a result, approximately fifty full time faculty at the college will now be represented by the Santa Fe Community College AAUP chapter.

The faculty won union representation by a vote margin of 93 percent to 7 percent.

Read the full article at the AAUP website here.

Cut to the Core

Inside Higher Ed
By Colleen Flaherty
April 3, 2017

Even the best laid curricula can go awry, or at least get stale.  So colleges and universities review and revise their cores or general-education programs with some regularity.  And that's what professors at Long Island University's two major campuses had agreed to do in recent years.

Then things went off course with the unprecedented faculty lockout at LIU's Brooklyn campus in September over union contract issues.  Faculty-administrative relations, already tense, took a nosedive, and curricular revisions took a back seat.

Now in another blow to faculty morale and shared governance, professors say, the university's Board of Trustees has imposed a credit cap and timeline for the typically faculty-driven curricular review process at both the Brooklyn and C.W. Post campuses.

Read the full article at the Inside Higher Ed website here.

Twitter: Students protest LIU faculty lockout in Sept.

Koch Money Brings Distress Over a University's Well-Being Institute

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Peter Schmidt
April 4, 2017

For a place that takes its name from a Greek word fir happiness, the new Eudaimonia Institute at Wake Forest University certainly generates its share of tension and worry.

The unease stems not from anything the institute has yet done, but from its chief source of financial support: a $3.7-million donation from the Charles Koch Foundation, a major bankroller of university programs that promote libertarianism and faith in the free market.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.

Monday, April 3, 2017

5 Pennsylvania Campuses Warn of Possible Faculty Layoffs and Program Cuts

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Alex Arriaga
April 3, 2017

Administrators form five Pennsylvania campuses notified the faculty union for the state's public-university system that layoffs could be expected by the end of the 2017-18 academic year.

The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties released a reaction statement to the news that California, Cheyney, Clarion, Edinboro, and Mansfield Universities of Pennsylvania face potential faculty and program cuts.

Read the full article at The Chronicle for Higher Education's website here.

Wayne State's Move to Strip 5 Professors of Tenure Sparks Unease About a Broader Threat

The Chronicle of Higher Education
By Sarah Brown
April 3, 2017

As Wayne State University takes the highly unusual step of trying to strip tenure from five medical-school professors who its president says are "abusing the tenure system," some faculty members on the campus say they're concerned that more tenure threats many not be far behind.

M. Roy Wilson, who has been the university's president since 2013, drew attention on Wednesday after a Detroit News article quoted him as saying that the five professors in question "not doing anything" and that "the bar is not that high."  Hearings for one of them took place on Wednesday and Thursday.

Read the full article at The Chronicle of Higher Education's website here.

Wayne State U.