Tuesday, April 28, 2015

House Panel Removes Faculty Union-Busting Language

Plunderbund
April 25th, 2015


On Tuesday, the House Finance Committee removed union-busting language from HB 64, the budget bill under heavy criticism by Ohio faculty.
How this language, straight out of 2011’s Senate Bill 5, got into the budget bill is something of a mystery. No one is claiming credit for it. In fact, everyone seems to be running from it. The Inter-University Council (the council of four-year college and university presidents) denies any involvement. Several university presidents have denied any involvement.
The language comes from a Supreme Court decision in 1980, NLRB v. Yeshiva University, which found that faculty at private universities who engaged in service on committees (like curriculum, hiring, or planning) were management employees and thus ineligible for union membership. While that ruling has crippled unionization at private colleges and universities, it has never been applied to public employees at state college and universities.

Censure Threat

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 28th, 2015

There’s been no shortage of criticism, both formal and informal, of how the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign handled the withdrawn faculty appointment of Steven Salaita last summer. (The university has a substantial number of supporters who say it was right to reject Salaita for the tone of his anti-Israel remarks on Twitter, but detractors have been numerous and vocal.) The latest disapproving report, out today from the American Association of University Professors, offers familiar complaints and also paves the way for the organization to hold a censure vote against the university later this spring.

Academic Freedom and Dr. Oz

Inside Higher Ed
April 28th, 2015

Mehmet Oz, a cardiothoracic surgeon and vice chair of the Department of Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center has attracted some attention recently because he has a TV show, The Dr. Oz Show, on which he spouts some incredibly stupid ideas about phony weight-loss cures and how psychics make you feel better.
But the recent debate about Oz centers on a question of academic freedom, after a group of 10 physicians wrote to Columbia University calling for him to be dismissed from his faculty position unless he stopped his dubious televised pronouncements.

Sweet Briar Faculty Members Sue to Block College’s Closure

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 27th, 2015

Fifty-six faculty members at Sweet Briar College have sued to block their institution from closing, The News & Advance, a newspaper in Lynchburg, Va., reported.
The lawsuit, filed in a state court, seeks $42 million in damages for tenured faculty members and an additional $2 million for nontenured faculty. It also asks the court to issue orders preventing the college from shutting down.
The women’s college, on a 3,250-acre campus near Lynchburg, announced suddenly last month that it would close in August, shocking many in the campus community and prompting the college’s supporters to begin an effort to keep the institution open.

An Administrator Turns Heads With a Pledge to ‘Take Back Control’ of the Faculty Senate

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 27th, 2015

Vowing to "take back control" of the Faculty Senate by electing an administration-friendly slate of candidates, an administrator at Kean University has raised eyebrows with an apparent directive to his subordinates to bring him the votes.
The Faculty Senate, which is holding elections through May 8, is scheduled to discuss the matter on Tuesday at the public university in New Jersey.
Senate officers sent an email to members last week telling them that they were aware of the administrator’s email and reiterating that voting is a private matter.
"You should never be placed in a position," it said, "to feel that you have to respond to someone (peer or supervisor) if asked who you voted for, if you voted, or plan to vote or ask you to show evidence that you have voted."

Rebirth of the Research University

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 27th, 2015

In California, some of us spend a good deal of time feeling nostalgia for days past (specifically, 1960) when the California Master Plan for Higher Education was codified, approved, and financed. In the world of higher education, this visionary plan was the greatest organizational idea for public higher education in the 20th century. It connected excellence in research to the mission of near-universal education by defining the roles of its three systems of universities, state colleges, and community colleges.
Today, however, there is a growing belief that higher-education systems modeled after the master plan have run their course; many people in state governments and the public at large not only assume that such a model costs too much in absolute terms, but also increasingly question the value and quality of higher education, particularly of the sort delivered at elite research universities. Indeed, at the root of debates about the cost of higher education, the worth of college, the vocational utility of degrees, and the commitment to teaching among research faculty, there is a widespread suspicion that we cannot have all that the master plan promised. There is a growing belief, in particular, that research can no longer be the primary mission of our great universities.

AAUP Takes Illinois to Task in Report on Salaita Case

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 28th, 2015

The University of Illinois violated principles of academic freedom in withdrawing a tenured faculty appointment to Steven G. Salaita over his harsh criticisms of Israel, the American Association of University Professors argues in a report released on Tuesday.
The university denied Mr. Salaita the due-process rights that his tenured status should have afforded him, and also violated widely accepted standards for academic governance by not letting relevant faculty and administrative bodies weigh in on his fate there, the report says. It says the university’s stated reasons for rescinding his appointment — concern that his inflammatory Twitter posts about Israel betrayed a lack of civility and portended his potential mistreatment of Jewish students — "have cast a pall of uncertainty over the degree to which academic freedom is understood and respected" at the Urbana-Champaign campus.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Arizona State and edX Will Offer an Online Freshman Year, Open to All

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 23rd, 2015

Arizona State University is joining with the MOOC provider edX in a project that it says “reimagines the freshman year” and opens a new low-cost, low-risk path to a college degree for students anywhere in the world.
The project, called the Global Freshman Academy, will offer a set of eight courses designed to fulfill the general-education requirements of a freshman year at Arizona State at a fraction of the cost students typically pay, and students can begin taking courses without going through the traditional application process, the university said in a news release on Wednesday. Because the classes are offered as massive open online courses, or MOOCs, there is no limit on how many students can enroll.

Iowa Legislator Wants to Give Students the Chance to Fire Underwhelming Faculty

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 23rd, 2015

A bill circulating in the Iowa State Senate offers a novel (and cutthroat) way to hold professors accountable: putting their fates into students’ hands, Survivor-style. Every year the professor most disliked by students would be voted off the campus.
The bill, introduced by Sen. Mark Chelgren, a Republican, would require the state’s public universities to rate professors’ performance based solely on students’ evaluations of their teaching effectiveness. Professors whose evaluation scores didn’t reach a minimum threshold would be automatically fired by the university.

8 Courses a Year for Every Professor? N.C. Lawmakers Ponder the Possibility

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 27th, 2015


A bill introduced late last month in the North Carolina General Assembly has set faculties across the state abuzz with a bold suggestion: Require all professors in the University of North Carolina system to teach at least eight courses each academic year.
Senate Bill 593 — titled "Improve Professor Quality/UNC System" — would reduce the salary of any professor who failed to hit that annual mark. Sen. Tom McInnis, a first-term Republican who sponsored the bill, said in a written statement that his mission was to "generate legitimate debate about the role of professors in the classroom."

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Negotiating Balance

Inside Higher Ed
April 22nd, 2015


Work-life balance might seem like an oxymoron to overworked faculty members, but an increasing number of institutions are trying to help their professors achieve it. So what policies are valuable and how can they effectively be included in union contracts? Those were some of the questions central to a panel discussion on negotiating work-life balance here Tuesday at the annual conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center (the National Center is housed at CUNY’s Hunter College).
At the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, negotiating balance came down to data. Joya Misra, professor of sociology and public policy at UMass, said her administration agreed to update some of its faculty contract provisions following a comprehensive study of its faculty. If that sounds familiar, Misra and her coresearchers have written about some of their findings. An article debunking the idea that men exploit parental leave policies to bolster their research portfolios instead of bonding with their children gained particular attention; the unnamed university in that study was in fact UMass Amherst.

Liberal Democrats pressure Clinton to advocate ‘debt-free college’

Washington Post
April 21st, 2015


Liberal leaders are pressuring Hillary Rodham Clinton advocate a national plan for "debt-free college" in her presidential campaign, part of a broader effort to convince the Democratic front-runner to embrace pillars of Sen. Elizabeth Warren's progressive agenda.
The push comes as prominent Democratic senators and House members plan to introduce resolutions calling for the elimination of student debt at public colleges and universities on Tuesday, while progressive activists have scheduled events at 10 college campuses -- all in a coordinated push to promote debt-free college as a major issue in the 2016 presidential race.
Although Clinton is not expected to unveil a detailed policy agenda until later this spring or summer, she mentioned rising student loan debt as a focus of her campaign during her visit to Iowa last week. "There's something wrong when students and their families have to go deeply into debt to be able to get the education and skills they need in order to make the best of their own lives," Clinton said at a Kirkwood Community College in Monticello.

Looking Beyond the Data to Help Students Succeed

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 22md, 2015

If Santa Monica College had relied solely on data analytics to predict whether Jaime J. would succeed, the picture would have looked bleak. He was, after all, a financially struggling, first-generation Hispanic student who was juggling a job with classes. His math skills were shaky.
But there was more to the picture than that. Using a 30-minute online assessment that focuses on noncognitive skills, advisers at the two-year institution in Southern California learned that Jaime was also a conscientious student with good study habits who had long dreamed of becoming a computer engineer.
The college assigned him a success coach (the college’s dean of counseling and retention), who met with Jaime weekly to keep him motivated.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Defending My Grades

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015


The emails poured in long after the semester was over: "I have never gotten anything below a B before, this must be a mistake." "I had an A all semester long and this must be a mistake." "Her class was mostly group work, how could I get a D in that? It must be a mistake."
As an adjunct instructor, the end of the semester brings, simultaneously, the joy and relief that a well-deserved break is on the way, and the fear and anxiety that another semester of work may not come again.
Being hired as an adjunct means working at the whim and mercy of the institution. As adjuncts, we know that going in, and we spend all semester knowing it. So when the semester ends, final grades are in, winter turns to spring, and we are no longer working for that same institution, a dilemma arises when students from the previous semester complain about their grades.

Even With Unions, Adjuncts Are Rarely Protected From Last-Minute Job Losses

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 21st, 2015


The movement to unionize adjunct instructors has yet to protect most of them from taking big financial hits from last-minute class cancellations, according to new study based on an analysis of contract provisions.
Just one in four union contracts covering adjunct instructors includes any sort of provision ensuring them some payment when a course assignment is canceled, the study found. Where such provisions are in place, for the most part, they let colleges cancel adjuncts’ classes with little notice and for a broad range of reasons, says a paper summarizing the study’s findings. Most ensure adjunct instructors reimbursements of only a few hundred dollars for the canceled work — a pittance considering the time some may have already spent on class planning.
The provisions say "a great deal about the structure of employment for adjunct faculty in the new academy," the paper argues. Such faculty members, it says, "are in a position of preparing classes just in case they are held, thereby providing unpaid labor."

Dear Administrator: Flip Your Meeting?

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 21st, 2015




Passive learning is when students are expected to receive information handed down by means of lectures and slides. It’s a time-tested form of course design that has repeatedly been shown to result in poor retention of the material. Certainly a well-crafted and well-delivered lecture can be a component of a great course. But relying too much on students to function as passive receptacles for information just doesn’t work that well.
Neither does relying on faculty members to be passive listeners. Yet far too many campus meetings follow the PowerPoint, information-dump model, in which an administrator (or even a fellow faculty member) stands at a podium and talks at the faculty, and then opens the floor to questions. What would happen if we thought of these internal meetings as a teaching moment, and applied the best practices of active learning?
I approached some faculty-development experts and asked for their thoughts on active learning and faculty meetings. Here’s what they said. 


Passive learning is when students are expected to receive information handed down by means of lectures and slides. It’s a time-tested form of course design that has repeatedly been shown to result in poor retention of the material. Certainly a well-crafted and well-delivered lecture can be a component of a great course. But relying too much on students to function as passive receptacles for information just doesn’t work that well.
Neither does relying on faculty members to be passive listeners. Yet far too many campus meetings follow the PowerPoint, information-dump model, in which an administrator (or even a fellow faculty member) stands at a podium and talks at the faculty, and then opens the floor to questions. What would happen if we thought of these internal meetings as a teaching moment, and applied the best practices of active learning?
I approached some faculty-development experts and asked for their thoughts on active learning and faculty meetings. Here’s what they said.
- See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/980-dear-administrator-flip-your-meeting#sthash.8pDCQMKD.dpuf

The Completion Agenda, Part 1

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015

Graduate school, the job market, the tenure track, and every other stage in an academic career are so fraught with challenge that you cannot afford to dawdle too long on foolish ventures or waste time holding out for perfection when "pretty darn good" will do.
The first supreme hurdle — the one that scares off many potential academics and cripples the progress of others — is, of course, the dissertation. What counts as a dissertation and how long you should take to complete it vary across disciplines, institutions, and committees. But that you must complete it — and that others must approve it before you can move on — is essential.
In this series I will focus on the "getting it done" aspects of the document that are not field-specific. But let’s begin with that existential imperative: No excuses, you must actually finish. Yes, there may be factors beyond your control and, yes, you may want to strive for perfection. But let me make the case for a completion agenda, above all considerations.

House Finance Committee Passes HB 64 Without Anti-Faculty Union Provisions

Ohio Conference
April 21st, 2015


Thanks in large part to the activism of our members and allies, the House Finance Committee passed Sub. HB 64 this evening without the language that would have stripped faculty of their collective bargaining rights.

The synopsis of the omnibus amendments can be found by clicking here.

The bill is slated to be voted upon by the full House of Representatives on Wednesday.

We cannot thank those of you who took action enough for helping to flood the representatives' offices with calls and e-mails. It made a difference!

In addition, we thank the House Democratic Caucus, in particular, Minority Leader Fred Strahorn, Rep. Denise Driehaus (Ranking Minority Member on Finance), and Rep. Dan Ramos (Ranking Minority Member on Finance Higher Education Subcommittee).

Without our legislative allies drawing a line in the sand on this issue, we couldn't have been successful.

Of course, we greet this development with cautious optimism. There is a chance that this language could reappear in the Senate. We will be diligent as the budget process continues to unfold.

Stay tuned for more information. And great work. We couldn't have done it without YOU.


Monday, April 20, 2015

College faculty oppose provision in new budget bill that would limit collective bargaining

Cleveland.com
April 20th, 2015

A measure inserted into the new state budget bill that critics call "anti-union" has drawn strong opposition from college faculty at Ohio's public universities.
The language included this week in the Ohio House Republicans' version of the state budget bill would reclassify full-time professors who participate in almost anything other than teaching and research as supervisors or managers, and thus exempt from collective bargaining.
Nearly identical language was part of the controversial Senate Bill 5, which weakened collective bargaining for public employee unions and was overwhelmingly overturned by Ohio voters in 2011.

Which Groups Are Favored?

Inside Higher Ed
April 20th, 2015


Last week a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences stunned many with its conclusion that women are more likely than men to be hired for faculty positions in science, mathematics and technology. To many who are familiar with the widespread reports of bias against women in STEM, the findings just didn't make sense.
This weekend another study was released at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association -- and this new study also found that men (and specifically white men) do not have the advantage that many assume they do in being hired in STEM fields. Women and black and Latino researchers instead have an advantage, the study found. It also found an apparent disadvantage for Asian researchers starting their careers.
The research suggests mixed patterns for those who are not white men when it comes to winning tenure. And women with a young child (a demographic group that includes many women) appear to be at a disadvantage in hiring and tenure.

Tenure, Not Hiring, Is Chief Bottleneck to STEM Faculty Diversification

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 17th, 2015

The researchers examined the career trajectories of people with doctorates in the STEM disciplines — science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — and related fields to try to determine why women and black or Hispanic people remain especially underrepresented in college faculty positions in those areas. The analysis used recent data from the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, a long-term National Science Foundation study that collects information on doctoral recipients in the STEM fields, social sciences, psychology, and economics over the course of their lives.
The researchers looked at about 31,300 doctoral recipients surveyed from 1993 to 2010, examining both their likelihood of obtaining tenure-track positions and their likelihood of obtaining tenure. The researchers were scheduled to present their findings on Friday at the American Educational Research Association’s annual conference, in Chicago.

U. of Wisconsin Flagship Will Cut 400 Positions in Response to Budget Cuts

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015

The University of Wisconsin at Madison will cut 400 positions, merge or close academic programs, and reduce support programs in response to anticipated state budget cuts, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. The announcement, from the flagship’s chancellor, Rebecca M. Blank, is the latest development in a battle over funds between the university system and the state government.
“I want to emphasize that these changes, as difficult as they are, cannot and will not stop with this year’s budget,” Ms. Blank wrote on her blog on Friday. “We will continue a thorough review of university operations, guided by our new strategic framework, to invest in our strengths and reduce or eliminate underperforming programs.”

A College’s High Ranking Often Means Less Time With Professors

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 17th, 2015

The researchers sought to determine what, if any, relationship existed between student engagement at any given college and how highly that institution was ranked by U.S. News & World Report, Forbes, or Washington Monthly. Their study examined data on more than 80,000 freshmen and seniors at 64 colleges ranked by each of the three magazines in 2013. The student data came from that spring’s administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement, or “Nessie,” which annually asks students a raft of questions about their campus experiences and their interactions with students, faculty members, and administrative staff members.
The researchers compared colleges’ rankings and Nessie results using a formula that took into account differences in the characteristics of institutions and students. They were scheduled to present their findings on Friday, at the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association.

Female Faculty in UCLA Center Faced Hostile Workplace, Inquiry Finds

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015

Female faculty members at the University of California at Los Angeles medical school’s research center on Alzheimer’s disease worked in “a climate of conflict, tension, hostility, and mistrust” and faced “unprofessional, demeaning” treatment, reports the Los Angeles Times, citing a letter that describes the results of an external investigation. The letter, from Jonathan Hiatt, vice dean for faculty, said the inquiry had confirmed complaints filed by three women, who said their treatment was retaliation for reporting violations of research protocols. The Times could not reach Mr. Hiatt for comment. The letter did not identify the women or the men found to have discriminated against them, and did not indicate whether anyone had been disciplined as a result of the findings.

Northwest Nazarene U. Puts Layoffs on Hold After Faculty Protest

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015

Northwest Nazarene University, a Christian institution in Idaho, has put on hold a plan to lay off six employees, including a popular professor of theology whose pending removal had prompted protests and a faculty vote of no confidence in the university’s president, the Idaho Statesman reports.
The professor, Thomas Jay Oord, and the other affected faculty and staff members had been expected to leave Northwest Nazarene at the end of the academic year, as part of budget shifts announced by the university’s president in March. But on Saturday the president, David Alexander, said in an email to university staff members that he was placing the layoffs on hold while a panel reviewed the budget decisions. The university’s Board of Trustees commissioned the review as part of its response to the controversy last week.
Faculty critics had accused the university of trying to get rid of Mr. Oord because of theological differences. In an open letter last week, Mr. Alexander apologized to Mr. Oord for the manner in which his changes had initially been handled, but he denied that the move had been driven by theological issues.

The Professor Is in: Asking About the Adjuncts’ Work

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015



In applying for a tenure-track job, I know I need to mention how my research plans fit in with the scholarship of the department’s tenured and tenure-track professors. But should I also talk about how it complements the work done by all of the non-tenure-track instructors in the department -- i.e., those with titles like adjunct, lecturer, or clinical faculty member?
Interesting question, and one that gets to the heart of a fraught issue over the have and have-nots in academia today. It reminds me of a controversial column published last month in The Chronicle by a tenured professor complaining about the role of adjuncts in a failed tenure-track search. Be sure and read it.
In the old days, the quick-and-dirty answer to your question would be: Adjuncts don’t count; don’t mention them. And that would still be true in many departments today. The fact is, even if 70 percent of a department’s courses are being taught by adjuncts, major departmental policy and hiring decisions are still monopolized – in many (and maybe most) places -- by tenured and tenure-track professors. The tenured, of course, make a case that they are the ones with years of past history and future investment in the department, compared with adjuncts and other contingent instructors who come and go. 

To Be a Featured Speaker at a Scholarly Meeting, It Helps to Be Male

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 20th, 2015


Four speakers, all distinguished scholars, all men: That was the plenary lineup at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting, held last month in Berlin. The lopsided demographics set off an active conversation on Twitter about the imbalance. A group of self-described early-career scholars got together and wrote a statement of polite but firm protest, which a senior scholar read on their behalf at the society’s business meeting.
One skewed year doesn’t demonstrate a bigger problem. But the debate among Renaissance specialists is just the most recent example of a broader conversation that has been gathering momentum as scholars at conferences, on email lists, and on Twitter do their own tallies of speakers and panelists at professional gatherings. Many of those counts turn up disparities that don’t favor women.

Friday, April 17, 2015

A Tenured Professor On Why Hiring Adjuncts Is Wrong

TPM
April 13th, 2015


It’s also no secret that they are getting a raw deal. Overworked and underpaid, they often struggle to get by and, when taken to an extreme, the consequences can be tragic.

Fight for 15K

Inside Higher Ed
April 16th, 2015


Low-wage workers in cities from New York City to Los Angeles participated in national day of protest Wednesday to draw attention to their fight for a living wage. Most of the workers were from home health and child care, retail, fast food, and other traditionally low-paying fields, but a significant number of protesters represented what is -- for some -- surprisingly low-wage work: non-tenure-track academic labor.
“I’ve been involved in adjuncting for 4 years teaching 10 to 12 classes a year, which is more than a full load and, quite frankly, I’m sick of it,” said Cole Bellamy, an adjunct instructor of composition at Saint Leo University who participated in a rally in support of adjuncts on the University of South Florida’s Tampa campus. “I work 50 percent more than a full-timer in order to make more than a living wage, and something needs to be done about that.”

Professor Manager

Inside Higher Ed
April 17th, 2015

Full-time faculty members at Ohio public institutions are objecting to proposed legislation with big implications for their right to organize unions. Tucked deep into a 3,090-page budget bill pending before the state’s House Finance Committee is language that would reclassify professors who participate in virtually anything other than teaching and research as supervisors or managers, and therefore exempt from collective bargaining. So serving on a committee, for example, turns a professor into a manager.
The language is nearly identical to another, ultimately failed piece of state-level legislation from four years ago, but faculty members consider the new bill a serious threat -- and they’re warning legislators of the possible consequences of its success.
“What would happen if this passes, I think, is that faculty would choose simply not to do service and without that, universities would grind to a halt,” said John McNay, chair of the history department at the University of Cincinnati’s Blue Ash campus and president of the Ohio conference of the American Association of University Professors. “People ought to be aware that we volunteer to do those things.”

Free Community College, Structured Pathways: Survey of 2-Year-College Leaders

Inside Higher Ed
April 17th, 2015


For all the talk about the prospect of free community college, most two-year-college leaders are skeptical about the feasibility that the concept will come to pass in their states.
Even with the federal support that President Obama has proposed as part of the initiative, community college presidents surveyed by Inside Higher Ed remain pessimistic that their state legislatures would support the idea.
The Obama administration's free community college initiative is just one of the issues covered in Inside Higher Ed's first-ever Survey of Community College Presidents, released today in advance of the annual American Association of Community Colleges convention.

A Field Guide to American Higher-Ed Reformers

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 6th, 2015


This short and easy-to-use field guide is designed to help both academics and lay audiences quickly identify some of the important species and subspecies that now occupy the higher-education landscape in the United States. Recognizing these various species, many of which are new to this environment, has become particularly important in this period of drastic university climate change and species migration.

Adjunct Professors Demand $15,000 per Course in National Protests

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 16th, 2015

Adjunct instructors joined low-wage workers on Wednesday in a national protest to demand higher pay. The Fight for 15 campaign — in which fast-food, retail, and health-care employees demand a $15 minimum wage and adjuncts demand $15,000 per course — was organized by the Service Employees International Union, which represents many part-time instructors.

Thousands of Workers Were Denied NYU’s Protections on Abu Dhabi Project, Probe Finds

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 17th, 2015

One-third of the work force used to build New York University’s campus in Abu Dhabi was not subject to the institution’s enhanced labor protections, an independent investigation has found. But the long-awaited results of the inquiry also state that the college’s commitment to the standards was “real, implemented in good faith, and, to a large measure, effective.”
The report, prepared by the investigative firm Nardello & Company, largely lays the blame on the developer overseeing the project and the contractor it hired for broadly applying an exception to the labor standards to thousands of migrant workers.

How LinkedIn’s Latest Move May Matter to Colleges

The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 17th, 2015

Whether or not college leaders realize it, last week’s announcement by LinkedIn that it would spend $1.5 billion to buy Lynda.com, a provider of consumer-focused online courses, carries notable consequences for higher education.
At the very least, it’s a sign of the growing interest in making academic and other educational credentials more visible and transparent to employers and others with reason to see them.
It could also be, in the words of one observer, a sharp reminder to colleges that if they don’t up their game in helping students and alumni with career transitions, there are many other organizations — giants like LinkedIn among them — that stand ready to fill that void.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Fight for 15 Inspires Bold Demands

Labor Notes
April 15th, 2015




As thousands of low-wage workers prepare to rally and strike on April 15, demanding $15 an hour and a union, their high-profile mobilization has already inspired workers in a range of industries far beyond fast food.
From school support staff to UPS part-timers, Fight for 15 is raising the confidence of unions to put bold demands on the bargaining table for their own low-wage members—and to back up those demands with community action.
The surge in low-wage worker organizing is also fueling campaigns to boost the minimum wage, spreading the momentum for $15 to new cities, including a wave of action across Canada.


As thousands of low-wage workers prepare to rally and strike on April 15, demanding $15 an hour and a union, their high-profile mobilization has already inspired workers in a range of industries far beyond fast food.
From school support staff to UPS part-timers, Fight for 15 is raising the confidence of unions to put bold demands on the bargaining table for their own low-wage members—and to back up those demands with community action.
The surge in low-wage worker organizing is also fueling campaigns to boost the minimum wage, spreading the momentum for $15 to new cities, including a wave of action across Canada.
- See more at: http://www.labornotes.org/2015/04/fight-15-inspires-bold-demands#sthash.Y3RE70Bh.dpuf