Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Why Administrators Should Love Shared Governance

The Chronicle of Higher Education - Vitae
September 2nd, 2014



Each fall ahead of its annual meeting, the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources offers a workshop on “Understanding Higher Education.” Once again, I am co-facilitating the daylong session, which is designed for people new to academe.The program focuses on academic lingo, trends, and traditions, and on the one concept that tends to baffle newcomers the most: shared governance.
If past workshops are any indication, I can predict the responses we will receive when we meet in late September and ask our icebreaker question, “What has surprised you most?” Participants will say things like:
* “It takes forever to get things done.”
* “I can’t believe I have to check in with so many people.”
* “I’m used to writing a memo to announce changes, but that doesn’t seem to be an option now.”
* “I was hired to be a decision maker, why can’t I just decide?”
From there, the conversation could easily devolve into a rant about academic bureaucracy, the impossibility of pleasing multiple stakeholders, and the absurdity of letting faculty (“people with no business experience!”) have a significant say in running large, complex organizations. 


Each fall ahead of its annual meeting, the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources offers a workshop on “Understanding Higher Education.” Once again, I am co-facilitating the daylong session, which is designed for people new to academe.The program focuses on academic lingo, trends, and traditions, and on the one concept that tends to baffle newcomers the most: shared governance.
If past workshops are any indication, I can predict the responses we will receive when we meet in late September and ask our icebreaker question, “What has surprised you most?” Participants will say things like:
* “It takes forever to get things done.”
* “I can’t believe I have to check in with so many people.”
* “I’m used to writing a memo to announce changes, but that doesn’t seem to be an option now.”
* “I was hired to be a decision maker, why can’t I just decide?”
From there, the conversation could easily devolve into a rant about academic bureaucracy, the impossibility of pleasing multiple stakeholders, and the absurdity of letting faculty (“people with no business experience!”) have a significant say in running large, complex organizations.
- See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/686-why-administrators-should-love-shared-governance#sthash.ULHdml87.dpuf
Each fall ahead of its annual meeting, the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources offers a workshop on “Understanding Higher Education.” Once again, I am co-facilitating the daylong session, which is designed for people new to academe.The program focuses on academic lingo, trends, and traditions, and on the one concept that tends to baffle newcomers the most: shared governance.
If past workshops are any indication, I can predict the responses we will receive when we meet in late September and ask our icebreaker question, “What has surprised you most?” Participants will say things like:
* “It takes forever to get things done.”
* “I can’t believe I have to check in with so many people.”
* “I’m used to writing a memo to announce changes, but that doesn’t seem to be an option now.”
* “I was hired to be a decision maker, why can’t I just decide?”
From there, the conversation could easily devolve into a rant about academic bureaucracy, the impossibility of pleasing multiple stakeholders, and the absurdity of letting faculty (“people with no business experience!”) have a significant say in running large, complex organizations.

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