Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1

The Chronicle of Higher Education - Vitae
September 3rd, 2014



Here is the first in a series of interviews with faculty who recently finished their first year on the tenure track. By reading about their experiences, new faculty members starting out this fall may get a better sense of what to expect.
Today we hear from Sam Redman, who just finished his first year as an assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he is also a faculty affiliate with the university’s Center for Heritage and Society. Check out Sam's faculty page or find him on Twitter @samueljredman.
Dan: Tell us about yourself. How do you see yourself as a scholar, and what do you research?
Sam: Teaching and writing are both central to what I do and shape my identity as a scholar. In fact, these core activities organize how I approach practically everything. For me, there is much more overlap in teaching and research than is often realized. When I'm reading in the archives, not only am I thinking about the research project I'm preparing to write up, I'm also considering how this material might inform what I do in the classroom. I strive to approach my work as a teacher-scholar. The more I learn, the better I’ll be at helping others do the same.

Here is the first in a series of interviews with faculty who recently finished their first year on the tenure track. By reading about their experiences, new faculty members starting out this fall may get a better sense of what to expect.
Today we hear from Sam Redman, who just finished his first year as an assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he is also a faculty affiliate with the university’s Center for Heritage and Society. Check out Sam's faculty page or find him on Twitter @samueljredman.
Dan: Tell us about yourself. How do you see yourself as a scholar, and what do you research?
Sam: Teaching and writing are both central to what I do and shape my identity as a scholar. In fact, these core activities organize how I approach practically everything. For me, there is much more overlap in teaching and research than is often realized. When I'm reading in the archives, not only am I thinking about the research project I'm preparing to write up, I'm also considering how this material might inform what I do in the classroom. I strive to approach my work as a teacher-scholar. The more I learn, the better I’ll be at helping others do the same.
- See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/685-tenure-track-wisdom-part-1#sthash.EY49zbdn.dpuf

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