Friday, July 25, 2014

Pre-Tenure and Publishing

Inside Higher Ed
July 25th, 2014

Early-stage researchers in South Korea are “significantly” more productive than those further on in their careers, a study has found, partly because the former are striving to gain tenured positions.
hose with up to 10 years’ experience in “hard” subjects such as science, engineering and medicine published an average of eight articles every three years in international journals, but this fell to less than seven when they reached the “established” career stage (11-25 years’ experience).
A drop in publication rates was also seen in “soft” subjects, including humanities, social science and business, when academics became “established,” according to the paper, “Research Productivity by Career Stage Among Korean Academics.”
These data contradict previous studies that found the reverse – that more experienced researchers out-publish more junior colleagues – notes the paper by Jisun Jung, a postdoctoral fellow in the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. She cites studies that suggest “most academics feel that promotion and tenure are more strongly dependent upon research output, and that the quantity of publications is more important than the quality.”

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